REFUGEE CARE THAT CHANGES LIVES

in Dallas, TX

The gospel of Jesus Christ is a crucial part of everything we do. It is our ultimate hope and the hope for the nations.

We provide long-term education for the whole family, from daily adult ESL classes to after-school tutoring.

Helping families adjust to life in the US and connecting them with key resources is foundational to our ministry.

This message is only visible to admins.

Problem displaying Facebook posts. Backup cache in use.
Click to show error

Error: Error validating access token: The user has not authorized application 1332798716823516.
Type: OAuthException

Safari and his family arrived in America after spending twenty years in a refugee camp. Read his remarkable story of surviving the Rwandan Genocide at Neighbors from the NationsSAFARI - 18/26: Coming to America!

“It’s the first time to get in the airplane. So when they gave us the appointment of coming here, we started to think about how we will go in the airplane. With 8 kids! And when we get to the airport, we start to see the planes and we were thinking about how the plane will fly! And how it will stay in the sky! How will it fly?

When it was starting to fly, all of us, we cry! We cry! Even my children. 'OHHHHHH!' We were scared! Will this plane fly? Because it’s the first time to go on the airplane! So, you know, when the airplane go up in the stomach, there is something which can go up. And when it goes down, there is something like, goes down. It was that. We think about how we will get in America!

So when we get at the airport, we have seen many, many different people. We were at DFW. Our meeting was with somebody, somebody who came to welcoming us, because they had a sign. And that sign, on the sign they wrote our names over there! All of the names! Safari, my wife, all of the kids! When we saw the sign, we said, 'Oh, my God, we get in America!'

I feel better and I have cry. Because it was a surprise to get here in United States! It's real! All of my kids, they surprised. It’s like, it’s like, to come to this place, you go in the good place. It’s like, sometimes you can’t cry. You be serious. But you happy in your heart.

In our culture, where we were, it was wonderful to have a cow. But when we got in America, we didn’t get it, a cow. So, even though, because we don’t have any decision to get it, it’s better to leave the cow in your mind because you don’t have a place where you can put a cow.”

#nftn #tutsi #hutu #genocide #comingtoamerica #dfw #refugee #resettlement #dallas #texas #congo #rwanda #refugeecamp #firsttimetofly #unitedstates #america #grateful #cows
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Follow us over at Neighbors from the Nations

Read Safari's story. It is powerful. He survived genocide, massacres, starvation, and decades in a refugee camp. We promise it is worth your time to read his story of resilience and strength.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

The 2020 (Pandemic, Drive-Thru, Socially Distant) FTNRO Christmas Store! ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

About 300 of our students and their families came through The 2020 Pandemic Drive-Thru Socially-Distanced FTNRO Christmas Store!

We loaded them up with wrapped gifts for their children (toys, shoes, coats), diapers, dry goods, and meat. Thank you to everyone who made this possible. We are thankful we get to share our hope and joy as we celebrate the birth of our Savior!
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This year's FTNRO Christmas Store looked different because of the pandemic, but we were still able to provide toys, shoes, coats, diapers, dry goods, and meat to hundreds of our students and their families! We are so happy to share the joy of Christmas with them!

THANK YOU to those who gave gifts and those who volunteered! We are so grateful. We could not do this without you! We "shopped" through the donations for each individual family and picked out gender/age appropriate gifts for the children. The gifts were then wrapped and labeled for each family, then put in a big trash bag so they'd be ready for a drive-thru pick-up!
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This is part 7 of Safari’s story, “When Life is Forever Changed.”

Follow Neighbors from the Nations to see the rest.SAFARI - 7/26 : When Life is Forever Changed

“The Rwandan Genocide started in April of 1994. I was 15 years old. I remember. Our father was listening to the BBC news in Kinyarwanda on the radio and we heard what was happening there: Hutus are killing all the Tutsis in Rwanda. The genocide took three months. One million and above they kill in three months.

We hear there are people who are suffering and those people who getting killing in Rwanda are Tutsi, as us, so we don’t know what will happen if these people are getting in our country.

The soldiers of the Tutsi in Uganda (those Tutsis, they were refugees from Rwanda who went to Uganda in 1959) came and fight them in Rwanda. They came to fight the Hutus. The Tutsi soldiers fight who are killing the people, the people who did the massacre, the murderers. When those soldiers came and fight them, the Hutus failed. The Hutus ran away from Rwanda and all of them, they run to Congo .

After the genocide, many Hutus came in our country. When they get there, they saw Tutsis as they saw in Rwanda. So Tutsis who lived in Congo, they come to hunting us as they have done in Rwanda. The Tutsis don’t have guns, they only have natural instruments. The Hutus use machetes and arrows. Guns later.”

#nftn #refugees
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

More of Safari's story is up at Neighbors from the Nations! Join us there!War. Famine. Persecution. Survival. Can you imagine?

This will be a collection of stories, snapshots, and glimpses into the extraordinary lives of refugees. They are our neighbors. And they have become our friends.

Welcome to Neighbors from the Nations.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Part Two of Safari's story is up! Follow us at Neighbors from the NationsSAFARI - 2/26

“First, Congo. About my village: Kivu, northern province. It’s green! Yeah, because there is not too hot or too sun. It is rainforest. It is in the mountains. In our village there were like 30 families. From January up to May, it’s a rainy. From June up to August, it’s a sunny. In September to December, it’s a good weather: it’s a not sunny or rainy. We live in the park, it’s like, some say a bush. On the side of a mountain. Green.

So you know, there is no villages like here in America. No highways. I didn’t see it. No vehicles. I didn’t see it. Because you know, we only acclimate to go on foot.

Maybe it’s good to make conversation about education when we were there in the village. Because the problem we had in our country, it was because of where we were. The problem of education is it was far away from where people live. The children may start the school when they turn seven years. No, not every one in the village go. They didn’t know the value of the study.

And many, many people there, they don’t know how to write. When they cross in primary six, or what you say middle school, they stopped over there. Because to found the high school, it is far, far. Sometimes it’s to go like 50 miles! If you complete primary six then you are finished. The schools that can cost the parents is high school. In Africa, 7th grade is like high school.”

#nftn #refugees
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Check out our new project, Neighbors from the Nations!SAFARI - 1/26

“My name is Safari. Of course, I’m mature, I’m 42 years old. Thank you so much to give us this opportunity to share our message, of our country, to share how we get here in America from where we born. Because our indiginous, of course, is Congo, but we grew up in Rwanda as refugee. You know, in this world there is many, many problems. People can hurt you without any reasons. So where we born, there were a conflict between a people. Those people kill each others, come and take our own, raped the wives. So when we see those things, we take decision to go to leave to save the life. We had to leave our country.”

#nftn #refugees
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Help create change in the refugee community.