REFUGEE CARE THAT CHANGES LIVES

in Dallas, TX

The gospel of Jesus Christ is a crucial part of everything we do. It is our ultimate hope and the hope for the nations.

We provide long-term education for the whole family, from daily adult ESL classes to after-school tutoring.

Helping families adjust to life in the US and connecting them with key resources is foundational to our ministry.

Level 4 Students and Level 5/6/GED Students, this grammar video is for you: Adverbs of Time ... See MoreSee Less
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The last chapter of Mesy's story is up at Neighbors from the Nations !MESY - Part 6 of 6"My mom’s family was from a village and there is a culture: everyone has tattoo. My mom have neck and chest tattoo for when she got married, like that. Husband’s name on hand, something like that. This is the culture. So when I was three years or four years baby, she said I cry, cry, cry because I want one on my head! So she gave me one. It is a cross on my forehead, she believed the cross. So the cross, I had it for almost all my life. Last year I went downtown and pay $80 and I remove. I don’t want it because it’s on my face. This generation, you don’t need tattoo. In another place, my hand, maybe, this is fine. But many people say, ‘You born in a village? Why you have tattoo on head?’ I say, ‘It was my mother’s culture.’ So I remove. Some jobs you can’t get if you have tattoo, you know.My favorite is Christmastime in America. I like everywhere--the lights, the decorations. I came to America at Christmastime. In America you get respect, they have welcome faces. In my country, someone can hurt you, you have no rights. In America, you have rights. And people have welcome faces.I pray every day for the Lutheran church people. Good people. They didn’t know me. I am black skinned, different country, but the pastor, he is like my dad to me. He came just two weeks ago with his wife to my house. He bring shoes for me! Good shoes for standing at my work.The very best thing that happened in America is I passed the citizenship test! I am an American Citizen! I passed the first time! I am so happy! Because sometimes I have an English problem, but it’s God helping me! America, bless America, it is good place. It is so good. Thank you so much to America for sometimes food, sometimes clothes, even teach English. May God bless you. God bless America!"#nftn #ethiopia #whoismyneighbor #kenya #kakuma #unhcr #refugees #friends #esl #resettlement #uscitizen #america #welcomefaces ... See MoreSee Less
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Are you following along with Mesy's story of being resettled in America? Join us at Neighbors from the Nations !MESY, Part 4 of 6"In 2007, they tell me I can come to America, but I must wait. Every week I go and they said, ‘Wait. Wait.’ After that, I go and push them, push them. I come to America in 2012.The UN arranged my sponsor for me, it was the Lutheran church. They do everything for me! At the airport they yell my name, I say, ‘I am so surprised!' They got me big card. They took me to Ethiopian house so we have coffee ceremony to welcome me, then we eat dinner and then go to our new house. These are good people.The culture is difficult, food is difficult, but I was happy because the church was near me, all the church people so kind. Every single day I went to church. I was with so many good people. People bring for me something. ‘Do you need anything? What can I do to help you?’ Even though I have a little bit of English problem, they show love to me. No Ethiopian people live in this town. But still everyone at church they hug me, say, ‘You’re beautiful!’ Every Sunday at church they say, ‘You’re beautiful!’ I say, ‘I am too happy!’The Lutheran church, they sponsored us for nine months. Mr. Richard, the pastor, they do everything for us. They come to the airport to pick us up, they give us house by the church--big house! It is named The Bethlehem House. We had laundry, everything! I go church every Sunday, sometimes I watch the baby nursery sometimes. I am so happy!"* picture of Ethiopian coffee ceremony#nftn #ethiopia #kenya #refugees #unhcr #resettlement #neighbors #friends #america #coffeeceremony #welcome #whoisyourneighbor ... See MoreSee Less
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Read more of Mesy's story at Neighbors from the Nations !MESY - Part 3 of 6"Before I went to live with my aunt in Kenya, she was seeking refugee status and was already registered without me. I could not go with her because she started the process before me. She got to go to America!I lived with her for four years. I was 18, and now I was alone. Before she left, she told me where to go to start the process, register, get papers. Then she said go to the refugee camp. I did this, and I went to Kakuma refugee camp. It’s a different people, different part of the country. It was very difficult for me with the food, it was every day the same thing. It was maize flour, you make like a porridge. I am new, and everything is new for me. The water was no good. It was so hot. I was weak, I was so much sickness. But maybe two or three months sick and then it’s good. I am adapt. When I get to the camp, they give me a blanket and hang it up, make it round like wall. I live with people from Congo, Burundi, Rwanda, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, wherever. Refugee people, you know, everything they share, share, share. When people leave refugee camp and go to America, Canada, Australia, wherever, they go, they send money back and share, share. It is like family too, you know? Some parts are good--like social life, the good people, different people. That part is good. The bad things--some people are bad, there is not enough food, and life is hard. Kakuma. I live there ten years. No job. We go to refugee school together. On Sunday you go to church. It’s outside, it’s hot. Everybody is hot. The clothes they come in donations, UNHCR brings donations."#nftn #refugees #friends #kakuma #ethiopia #kenya #nairobi #whoisyourneighbor ... See MoreSee Less
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Meet Mesy, a refugee from Ethiopia. Neighbors from the Nations"MESY" (name changed) - Part 1 of 6"I am from Ethiopia, East Africa. Where I was born is like a small village, not big city. I lived with my family in a house, some say hut, with two rooms inside. The walls are made of wood and mud, then make water and dust, sort of like a concrete. (wattle and daub) The house was made when my mom was young, so it is old house. The floor is dirt, hard dirt. You use a broom to clean up. You clean up with the broom every single day. In the bedroom you have a small carpet. My mom and dad had a bed, then there were two other beds and all the girls share. I had four big sisters. Some sleep on the floor, or on the sofa. My mom was business woman. She had a small business selling food. She sold food at the market. She didn’t cook it, she sells the materials and other people cook it. She bring other things from other place, and she would sell it in her store--things like beans, organic produce from farmers, wheat flour for bread, things like that. My dad was a soldier. When a new president came, he fought in the war between Ethiopia and Eritrea. He disappeared, no came back. No one knows what happened to him. That time I was a baby but I know him. The picture, my mom show me. I know his face. My mom was waiting, waiting, waiting for my dad. No coming. Everyone say to her, 'You need to go on with your life. Why waiting? Why you let him take your life?' That time she’s like 37 or something. I was maybe 5 or 6 years old. So she married again and got two babies, two boy babies. So I have two brothers younger.When I was like, 10 or 11, my mom was sick. She had a heart problem. She stay in the hospital for a week and she came home, but then she go again to hospital for more than one month. Then she passed away. I was with her sometimes. Every week one sister stay with her, then another sister, then me, and we change. She was crying and she has so many stress, she tell the doctor, 'What about my children? What will I do about this problems?' The doctor told me she is serious condition. I knew everything, even though I was small girl."#nftn #refugees #war #friends #esl #ethiopia #eastafrica #whoismyneighbor ... See MoreSee Less
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Did you know you can support For the Nations Refugee Outreach when you order from Amazon? So far, we've gotten $1468.68 from Amazon Smiles! It's easy to do, and it's free! Every little bit matters.Go to smile.amazon.com and select us as your charity. Thank you! ... See MoreSee Less
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Levels 5&6, here's your new lesson: www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0aKyMFtEig&authuser=0 ... See MoreSee Less
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Level 4 Students: Here's a new lesson! youtu.be/7UKr-rrvPG4 ... See MoreSee Less
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Who is your neighbor? Join us at Neighbors from the Nations !One tiny ballerina in this picture doesn't know that the friend whose hand she's holding was once kidnapped by Boko Haram. She knows nothing about how the brave mother of her friend sacrificed to get her daughter back, and how they left everything and fled their country to save both of their lives. That's how they became neighbors in America. Here, they laugh, play, learn ballet, and hear about how much Jesus loves them. #nftn #refugees #friends #loveyourneighbor ... See MoreSee Less
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FTNRO STUDENTS: If you had damage from last week's ice storm and you need help, please private message us and let us know. ... See MoreSee Less
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Help create change in the refugee community.